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The Scientific Method: Homeschool Learning Resources

When it comes to exploring God and His creation, simple observation goes a long way to enhancing our appreciation and understanding of the world around us. This is how ancient natural philosophers viewed their world millennia ago.

However, we as scientists and students exploring science must take a more methodical approach to learning how our world works.

This approach is known as the scientific method, a methodical process used during scientific investigation that follows certain steps. One way those steps can be described is:

These steps are:

  1. Ask a question.
  2. Begin preliminary research.
  3. Establish a hypothesis.
  4. Test the hypothesis with experiments.
  5. Evaluate the data from the experiments.
  6. Draw your conclusion.
  7. Present your findings.

Let’s explore these steps in more detail:

Ask a Question

The first step in learning about the world around us is observing and asking questions about what we see.

Your question is the first step in the process to discovery. Why does something happen? How does something happen? What happens during this particular set of circumstances? Your most exciting research will begin with the words “What if…?” or “I wonder…”

Ask the question you want answered and make notes of any sub-questions or related ideas that come to mind.

Begin Preliminary Research

Next, you’ll want to do a little preliminary research. The more you know about your topic, the easier it will be to conduct a relevant experiment. 

Research previous studies, read through earlier experiments, and gather information on your topic through an online search or at the library. Remember, other scientists may have asked the same question before, but your approach will be unique to you.

Establish a Hypothesis

Your next step is all about what you think based on what you’ve researched. Ask your question, read through your notes, then make the most educated guess you can.

This is called forming a hypothesis. Your hypothesis should be testable and also include predictions of what you think the experiments will show. Make notes of testable variables so you can create experiments to compare and contrast different outcomes.

Test the Hypothesis With Experiments

Now comes the fun part. It’s time to gather your materials and perform your experiments. Use your predictions and your variables to create experiments to test your hypothesis.

You will take copious notes of all your experimentation, any changes in variables you made, as well as what happened during each step of the experiment. This way, you can repeat any experiment to see if you get the same results.

You can also make drawings or graphs to help describe your results. These will help when it comes time to present your findings. Remember the preliminary research you did in step 2? You can use your own notes to research ideas for future topics for experiments!

Evaluate the Data From the Experiments

Okay, now it’s time to evaluate your data. What did you determine during your experiments? Did the results prove or disprove your hypothesis? Or did your experiments present even more questions you want to answer?

You may want to change or add variables, amend your original hypothesis, and perform additional experiments. This extra data can help you finalize your conclusion.

Draw Your Conclusion

Once you have analyzed all the data you gathered from your experiments, you can draw your conclusion. This is what you’ve been working toward!

What does it mean to draw a conclusion? During this step, you will decide if what you thought would happen, happened. Your experiments should have answered your initial question, and repeated experiments should have had the same results.

With this information, you can make a solid conclusion based on the comparison of your hypothesis and your experimental data.

Present Your Findings

Whether you’re creating a project for a science fair, completing a homework assignment, or just experimenting to learn more about the world, the last step is to present your findings.

Produce a presentation (like a display, paper, or video) with your questions, hypothesis, and results. Present your notes and drawings to someone to evaluate. Or just tuck your findings into a science notebook filled with other wonders you’ve discovered.

It’s a good idea to practice presenting your findings to a group. If you pursue a scientific career, you’ll be doing just that after you follow the scientific method to learn more about your chosen field.

The scientific method is a solid procedure for discovering, evaluating, and researching the vast world around us. By implementing the steps, you improve your research skills and learn valuable information you can apply in many different ways.

The History of the Scientific Method

Have you ever wondered how scientists developed the steps needed to make discoveries? The history of the scientific method is fascinating.

Egyptian, Indian, and Babylonian scientists from thousands of years ago made notes and conducted experiments. But the scientists from ancient Greece actually developed some of the steps we recognize today as the scientific method.

Early philosophers of the time thought the way to arrive at knowledge through pure reasoning. They would observe the world around them, form conclusions, and then assume their conclusions must be correct.

Others, like Aristotle, saw the benefit of making detailed, systematic observations in order to build on known patterns and observations. This was quite different from Greek philosophers like Plato, who didn’t think observations were valuable because they thought the observable world was corrupt.

Aristotle’s method included:

  1. Researching information others had already written on a subject.
  2. Finding generally accepted ideas regarding a question on that subject.
  3. Studying the subject systematically to gain more information.

Aristotle’s method was incomplete, however. It wasn’t really a scientific method, but it was a start.

Centuries later, men like Robert Grosseteste and Roger Bacon expanded these steps by emphasizing the importance of testing conclusions to see if they’re true, then making more observations and testing again. At that point, the scientific method was born.

With enough experimentation, a hypothesis can be confirmed as true. Then it becomes a theory, the next step in the scientific method.

And this is how scientists today broaden the knowledge in their fields. They stand on the shoulders of giants to see even farther and gain more understanding of the world today.

In our books and courses, you will find explanations of the scientific method and experiments which allow you to use the steps to learn more about the world around you through science.

 

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How to Homeschool High School Science and Why You Should

You’ve mastered elementary and middle school science with your students. Keep up the good work with your homeschool science adventure as you dive into high school. We’ll help you!

Exploring science in the early grades is fun and exciting, but the prospect of introducing biology, chemistry, and physics to your high schoolers can be daunting.

Let’s explore how to transition from middle school to high school science to maintain your momentum.

Getting Ready For High School Science

If you’ve been homeschooling a while, you’re familiar with the laws in your state. You can find more information here. Review the requirements for high school graduation in your state to help you set educational goals.

If your student is college-bound, see what (if any) requirements your state has for high school graduation in a homeschool setting.  Just remember, even students who may not intend to go to college can use solid high school science knowledge in many different trades. Plus, if they change their minds, you’re all one step ahead.

Make your high school plan based on your research. Here at Berean Builders, we suggest teaching high school science in a specific order since math knowledge and science course progression go hand in hand.

Using a Curriculum for High School Science

Maybe you’ve enjoyed a child-led exploration of early grades using an eclectic mix of learning opportunities. You can still do that in high school, but to assure a more thorough science education, consider adding a curriculum designed to cover what your student will need after graduation.

A prepared curriculum offers lessons in a logical order that allows students to build on previous knowledge when presented with more complex concepts.  If you do not feel equipped to provide a solid science curriculum for your student, coops and online classes can be utilized as a way to aid independent study at home.

With high school science, your student may complete much of their work on their own. Sit down with them to determine a schedule of study so they can stay on track and understand what is expected of them by certain dates. Set aside days to review their work and take regular assessments as the year progresses.

You don’t have to know high school science to facilitate your student’s education in the subjects. Be creative, be resourceful, and don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Transitioning from Middle School to High School Science for Homeschoolers

Early years of homeschool consist of plenty of guided lessons. Once your student is ready for high school, you can begin to guide less and encourage more independent study. This not only takes some of the pressure off you to actually teach science but sets up your student for self-guided learning that will serve them well in college and life beyond.

Middle school science covers general ideas through life, earth, and physical science courses. This builds a framework for your high schooler to expand upon as they cover deeper concepts through biology, chemistry, and physics.

Your student may spend longer on a specific topic than they did in middle school. And while you may have presented engaging experiments to bring an idea to life then, in high school, your student will be much more methodical about lab work.

Notebooks are one possible way to study however, some students prefer notecards, some use highlighting and margin notes, and some prefer making outlines.  As your high schooler investigates a topic, have them write or draw their understanding of the idea. This can can be used later for study and will also give you insight into how well they are learning a subject.

High School Science Labs at Home

Typical graduation requirements for high school include science labs .  You can find many virtual labs for high school science that broaden your student’s understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, and physics. However, It is important to note that virtual labs are not accepted by universities.  Real labs are necessary to meet their requirement.

At Berean Builders, we understand how important hands-on learning is for science. Which is why we provide appropriate labs and experiments with clear instructions to immerse your student in the current topic of study.

Put lab time on your student’s schedule and make it a priority to fulfill those lab credit requirements.

Join Homeschool Science Groups

Clubs and co-ops can make high school science even more exciting for your high schooler. Not only will your student be introduced to new friends, but they will get a feel for working with a group of like-minded individuals. This may help them at university, or even set them up for success in a scientific field after graduation.

Seek out science groups in your area or find an online group if that better suits your situation. Your student can discuss concepts, participate in experiments, play games, and compete in challenges all while increasing their circle of friends and acquaintances along with their scientific knowledge.

High School Science as Life

Homeschool parents know it is impossible to compartmentalize individual subjects, so you take that to heart as you find the science, history, and math in everyday learning.

Knowing this allows you to explore the science in other subjects.

It also allows you to use science as a springboard into historical events or even activities in your own life such as cooking or gardening. Science is woven into every aspect of our days and nights, and you can create plenty of opportunities for observation and wonder. That they learn science is indeed a bonus.

In addition, by applying lessons to life, your student will not have to ask, “When will I ever use this knowledge?” They will be able to see the significance immediately.

Let Your High Schooler Lead Within a Framework

Having a well-planned curriculum can make your high school science year easier, but what if your student becomes deeply interested in a particular topic? In elementary and middle school, you could go off on tangents and then swing back to the main plan.

What about high school? Can you still take a deep dive into one fascinating topic?

The beauty of homeschool is that your student is able to explore one idea for an extended time without getting too far off schedule. All that delight-directed learning satisfies high school requirements, more so if hands-on experiments are included. The curriculum will be waiting when they return.

They’re Never Too Old for Field Trips

Your younger students probably spent many happy hours on field trips for science. Do they have to give up that fun for high school? No!

High school science offers even more opportunities to learn away from home. Older students are often welcome to take tours of places younger kids can’t go. Take advantage of factory tours and career days so your students can meet experts and ask lots of questions. They may even get inspired about their future!

You can also arrange visits to science departments at nearby colleges and universities. What better way to get a taste of science on campus than to see it in person?

High School Science Does Not Have to Be Boring

Keep in mind that fresh feeling of discovery when your students were in earlier grades. Bring that joy along for the homeschool science adventure in the upper grades.

Forget the sleep-inducing textbooks of your high school science experience. Today you have many more resources at hand to make high school science fun.

  • Work with a textbook that is conversational, not dry.
  • Present in-home lab experiments that are engaging.
  • Incorporate videos and nonfiction books into your plan for the year.
  • Allow your student to follow their interests.
  • Join high school science groups.
  • Make plenty of field trip memories.
  • Experiment with online classes if your student enjoys lecture-style learning.
  • Seek support from educators and scientists to deepen your student’s understanding.

Your student can enjoy high school science, and you can relax, and rest assured you’ve given them the very best homeschool science experience.

High School Science at Home

With all the resources available to you, high school science at home is not only possible, but also recommended! You homeschooled through the lower grades, and you know your student better than anyone.

You don’t have to love or even be good at science to offer your student the very best high school science education that will take them right into college or the trade of their dreams. Plus, a solid science base can help your homeschool student be at the top of the list for STEM scholarships at their preferred college or university.

Remember, Berean Builders is here to help you with science, and we have even more resources for you.

How to Choose the Ideal Homeschool Curriculum

Find out why we teach the sciences in a specific order: biology, chemistry, physics

Homeschool Physics? Yes!

Science Courses Online? Here are the benefits!

Science Labs at Home

Preparing Your Student for College Science

Looking For Specific High School Level Science Resources?

Berean Builders offers a variety of excellent courses for your high school level learner as well.  We have all of your high school science needs covered with our comprehensive approach.

Discovering Design with Biology

Discovering Design with Chemistry

Discovering Design with Physics

Discovering Design with Earth Science

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How to Transition from Public School to Homeschooling

homeschooling family

If you are thinking about moving your children from the public school system to homeschooling, you are not alone. An increasing number of parents each year find themselves keeping their children out of the classroom and making the switch  to homeschooling.

It’s good to recognize that homeschooling, although quite beneficial and even fun, may present some challenges. Every family’s experience will be different and may present unique obstacles to be overcome.

One of the biggest challenges that you will have to deal with is in making that transition from the traditional school setup to homeschooling. This is completely normal, since most of us have only ever been a part of the public school system!

Continue reading How to Transition from Public School to Homeschooling

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Creating An Excellent High School Transcript for Your Homeschool

Mother and son working at table

You are resolved to finally do something about that transcript you know you need to create for your student.

This is your year to see this resolution to completion. But where to start?

Making a high school transcript can sometimes feel daunting, but the good news is, it doesn’t have to be complicated. You can do it!

Continue reading Creating An Excellent High School Transcript for Your Homeschool

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Finding The Right Science Curriculum For Your Homeschool: K-8

which science course should I choose

When planning out your homeschool year, you want to include engaging science information to help your student understand our amazing world.

But which course should you choose? And in which order should you use the available courses?

Finding The Right Science Curriculum For Your Homeschool: K-12

Let’s start with the elementary years.

The good news: you can pick any one for elementary grades!

Since elementary years are all about becoming proficient in reading, writing, and math, your student will spend a lot of time practicing these skills.

We want to make science fun while helping your student learn to observe, record, and marvel at the universe around them.

Which is why you can begin your elementary homeschool science adventure with any one of these engaging courses.

We even make it easy by letting you know what concepts your student should already know when beginning a course.

If they need to know a bit more about a topic than the course offers, a quick online search will fill in the gap.

 

Let’s examine the sequence of the science courses offered.

Although the courses explore scientific developments chronologically, you may choose to present them in any order depending on your other homeschool subjects or the time period that interests your student.

For Students in Grades K-6

Science in the Beginning

You can start with this course to give your student a solid foundation of how our world was created.

Using the days of creation as an outline, the material covers basic concepts such as

  • the properties of light, air, and water,
  • basic botany, zoology, and human physiology,
  • and our solar system.

This examination of how the world began helps students understand the beauty of the Creator and the wonder of His works.

Science in the Ancient World

Follow the Beginning with a look at how ancient scientists explored God’s creation to learn more about the Creator.

Covering the years 600 BC to 1500 AD, this course covers the work of these naturalists and philosophers, both the concepts they got right and the mistakes they made.

Since this course examines early science as it was developed, your student will discover a wide range of new ideas including

  • early medicine,
  • basic physics and simple machines,
  • the Earth’s place in the solar system,
  • astronomy,
  • botany,
  • and the effects of erosion.

As they are introduced to the science and the men who furthered fresh ideas, your student will also come to understand the later scientists for the devout Christians they were.

Science in the Scientific Revolution

Expand on the fresh scientific ideas from the ancients with the next book in the series.

The time covered in this course is less than 200 years, and the advances made in the basic areas of science were vast.

Also covering science as it was developed, the topics included echo those in Science in the Ancient World, but on a deeper level.

Your student will increase their understanding of

  • astronomy,
  • the physiology of plants, animals, and human anatomy,
  • basic physics,
  • and the scientific laws developed during this time.

The scientists who investigated the world around them from 1543 to the end of the 1600s were pioneers and curious about the world around them. They were also men of God interested in learning more about the Creator and His creations.

 

Science in the Age of Reason

Continuing the tour through the history of scientific development, this next course explores natural philosophers from the early 1600s to the early 1800s as they built on previous discoveries to further their understanding of the world around them.

Topics include

  • astronomy,
  • basic chemistry and physics concepts,
  • human physiology, botany and zoology,
  • and atmosphere and weather.

Not only will your student see how new science discoveries begin with older ideas, but they will also understand how the worldview of the scientist can affect their conclusions.

 

Science in the Industrial Age

The final book in the elementary science series covers discoveries made from the early 1800s to the early 1900s.

As scientists continued to explore the world, they made a multitude of new discoveries and advancements.

Your student can follow these discoveries in

  • medicine and human physiology,
  • basic physics and chemistry,
  • evolution,
  • and explore the development of new scientific laws.

They will also learn the beliefs of the scientists and how those worldviews directed their theories and conclusions.

A Well Rounded Tour of Elementary Science

These five courses follow science through history and demonstrate the growth of scientific discovery and understanding.

Each course includes many hours of hands-on activities to keep the lessons engaging for elementary students, plus three levels of review exercises so you can choose the depth of understanding you wish for your student.

An added benefit of these five courses is they are multi-level.

This means even if you are diving into homeschooling in the later elementary years, you can choose any course to begin your scientific journey.

In addition, you can teach several ages/grade levels using the same course by assisting younger children with the experiments or using the more thorough review exercises for older students.

Middle School Science for Students in 7th and 8th grades

When your student is headed into the middle grades, you may wonder which courses to choose next.

The most important factor in deciding on a course is your student’s level in mathematics.

Since the courses offer problems involving calculations, you’ll want to be sure your student comprehends that math level before you dive into a course to assure their success.

In addition to observing and recording their experiences, your student will be asked to learn and apply specific concepts, both in the abstract and in the concrete with hands-on experimentation.

 

Science in the Atomic Age

Science in the Atomic Age

Modern scientists have furthered our understanding of the world around us, and this course covers these discoveries.

From atoms to biomes, this course covers the organization of our world and God’s design in nature.

Because this is a laboratory-based course, your student will have plenty of hands-on experiments and activities to help them grasp the concepts presented.

The topics build on what the student has already learned in earlier science studies, and the experiments can be performed using common household items easily found in local shops or online.

Discovering Design with Earth Science TextbookDiscovering Design with Earth Science

This course explores earth in great detail from the formation of rocks to the properties of water and the interaction of each on our earth’s crust.

Your student will need a firm grasp of 7th grade math to do the calculations presented.

Your student will be able to exercise critical thinking as they are presented with the opposing ideas of uniformitarianism and catastrophism.

Each of these concepts is presented in a fair and balanced examination with plenty of follow-up questions to generate thoughtful contemplation.

This course also includes 55 hours of laboratory instruction using hands-on activities and experiments.

A kit containing laboratory materials is available for purchase, and some of the experiments can only be performed with items from the kit.

 

As you can see, these seven courses cover science from creation to modern day exploration.

You and your student can decide which of the elementary topics to cover and in which order.

And your middle schooler can move confidently into more complicated science when they have the math proficiency to do so.

We hope this helps simplify your homeschool science curriculum choice!

We’re available to answer any questions and to help your student explore God’s world through hands-on science.

Looking For High School Level Science Resources?

Berean Builders offers a variety of excellent courses for your high school level learner as well.  We have all of your high school science needs covered with our comprehensive approach.

Discovering Design with Biology

Discovering Design with Chemistry

Discovering Design with Physics

Discovering Design with Earth Science

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Homeschooling Based On My Child’s Learning Style

Homeschool parents are gifted with a unique perspective about their children. By watching them grow and learn, home educators have direct access to how their students process new information.

Knowing and understanding this learning process, labeled “learning style”, is beneficial to creating a homeschool environment suited to both parent and student.  Working with your child’s learning style aids in their understanding and retention of  the information you explore in your homeschool.

“A learning style is the way in which a person sees or perceives things best and then processes or uses what has been seen. Each person’s individual learning style is as unique as a signature. When a person has something difficult to learn, that student learns faster and enjoys learning more if his or her unique learning style is affirmed by the way the teacher teaches.”  Marlene D. LeFever  from her book Learning Styles

If you’ve asked the question, “What is my child’s learning style?”, we’ve got your answer.

In this guide, we explore different styles of learning and discuss complimentary teaching strategies to help you and your child get the most from each modality.

Continue reading Homeschooling Based On My Child’s Learning Style

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4 Important Beginner Homeschooling Tips For Parents

A stack of Berean Builders Elementary courses sits atop a dining table in the foreground while a mother speaks with her daughters around the table in the background

If you are a beginner who is starting out in your homeschooling journey, these tips will help you get started and navigate many nuances of homeschooling.

Homeschooling Pros and Cons

There are more than 2 million homeschoolers in the US today, with the numbers rising significantly in 2020 because to the school closures due to the pandemic. Despite the many benefits provided by homeschooling, it can turn out to be an overwhelming experience for both the parents and the students.

There is a constant need to create structure in the learning environment, which can often be a source of frustration for everyone. Students become more prone to missing out on deadlines or falling behind on their assignments. Additionally, there are the mental and emotional challenges of at-home learning.

4 Important Beginner Homeschooling Tips For Parents

Continue reading 4 Important Beginner Homeschooling Tips For Parents

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3 Benefits of a Historical Approach to Science In Your Homeschool

Taking a historical approach to science in your homeschool helps make the learning come alive! In this approach,  students learn science in the order it was discovered by the great scientists of history.

If you have multiple children in elementary level studies, good news! Dr. Wile’s elementary science series contains multi-level books you can use for any grade K-6. And the unique feature of this wonderful course is it uses history as its guide. Science Through HiStory is elementary science simplified! Science concepts are presented in the order they were discovered while constantly reminding students of the Creator who fashioned the marvels they are studying.

Homeschool Science: Historical vs. Topical

Most elementary science programs are built around a topical approach to science where students work through a unit focused on one area of science (i.e., weather) before moving to a different topic.

But Berean Builders’ five-volume Science Through HiStory series takes a completely different approach, exploring science through a chronological journey through science.

Students learn science in the order it was discovered by the great scientists of history. As a result, the topics change frequently.

For example, in the first 15 lessons of Science in the Ancient World, students learn about measuring tall things, fire, music, atoms, and medicine. The topics are unified by the people who studied them and the way science was developing at the time.

You may be asking, “Why chronological science?”

3 Reasons to Teach Science Using a Historical Approach

  1. Students learn the enormous debt science owes to Christianity. 

Many unsuspecting students are taught that Christianity has opposed science throughout history. In fact, if it weren’t for Christianity, we wouldn’t have the science we have today. When a

student sees how science developed, this truth becomes obvious.

  1. Students get a more realistic view of how science works.

Science is mostly about making mistakes and then learning from those mistakes. For example, in other curricula, students could be taught a brief synopsis of how the scientific view of the solar system changed over time. In our course, they learn in detail what scientists initially thought and see each major step that produced the modern view of the solar system.

  1. Thanks to frequent review, students have better retention. 

In a historical approach, students continually revisit science topics but in the context of a new person and how he refined an old idea. This narrative method makes science more interesting than a topical approach so children remember the material longer.

For more information about our historical approach to science, see p. 4 of the catalog.

The Eras of Science Through HiStory

science in the beginning book cover

Science in the Beginning uses the Biblical days of creation to introduce a wide range of scientific topics including the nature of light, energy conservation, the properties of air and water, introductory botany, our solar system, basic zoology, and some aspects of human anatomy and physiology.

science in the ancient world book cover

Science in the Ancient World covers the work of the natural philosophers who lived from about 600 BC to the early 1500s AD and presents science as it was developed. The ancient scientists, some who were devout Christians, got a lot right but also missed the mark on certain ideas. We explore these mistakes to advance our understanding of the natural world.

science in the scientific revolution book cover

Science in the Scientific Revolution spends time with natural philosophers from 1543 to the end of the 1600s covering new science concepts as they were discovered. From human anatomy to electricity and the laws of motion, this book shows the scientific thinking of the philosophers who embraced the Christian faith.

science in the age of reason book cover

Science in the Age of Reason sheds light on the discoveries of scientists from the 1600s to the early 1800s. The book covers a wide range of topics being discovered at the time and allows students a peek into the worldview of these pioneers and how that worldview shaped their scientific conclusions.

science in the industrial age book cover

Science in the Industrial Age encompasses the multitude of scientific discoveries that took place during the 1800s and early 1900s. The variety of topics covered includes biology, chemistry, geology, medicine, cell biology, and radiation, and brings to light how the worldview of the scientists affected the conclusions they drew.

Flexible and Engaging Science for Elementary Students

Each of these books can be used as a stand-alone science text and presents plenty of hands-on activities to keep elementary students engaged and curious.

Plus, with three levels of review for the lessons, you can adjust the level of challenge for each individual child. Older students can work with their younger siblings to enrich their science learning experience.

Coordinate Your History and Science Lessons If You Choose

What’s this special approach that no other science program takes? It’s a chronological one.

With this linear approach, it seems a natural fit to synchronize your Berean science to whatever history program you’re using. We have a guide here where you can find detailed notes for meshing these popular history programs with the Science Through HiStory series:

  • Biblioplan
  • Diana Waring
  • My Father’s World
  • The Mystery of History
  • Simply Charlotte Mason
  • Story of the World
  • Tapestry of Grace
  • Veritas

But Should I Synchronize My Science and History Programs?

Yes, aligning your history and science programs may make sense on the surface, but please be forewarned: The process is a bit difficult and not all that beneficial.

First of all, history progressed at a steady pace, but science did not. Science started out slowly and then gained a lot of momentum as the Christian worldview developed. It gained even more momentum as technology developed.

For example, Science in the Ancient World covers about 2,100 years of history. The next book, Science in the Scientific Revolution, covers only 200 years. And the remaining two books, Science in the Age of Reason and Science in the Industrial Age, cover only 100 years each. Science in the Atomic Age (for junior high) also covers only about 100 years.

Your history program’s pace may not match at all!

We think the best thing you can do is cover history and science separately without worrying about matching them up perfectly. When you encounter the same ideas, scientists, or events in a different course, you get a chance to review what was already covered!

Your homeschool is a reflection of you and your family’s needs and goals.

We are delighted to offer this flexible, chronological approach to elementary science you can use in the way that works best for you!

And, as always, we are available to answer your questions about how to get the most out of our courses for your unique homeschool experience.

 

 

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4 Best Tips For Motivating Your Homeschooled Child

When you homeschool your child, you watch them learn and grow. You know how your child processes new information. You develop an understanding of your child’s learning style. And it is pure bliss to see your child expand their pool of knowledge. But, at-home schooling comes with a few challenges that parents have to navigate.

Does your child spend more time in front of the television than with their books? Are they lagging in their high school science course sequence? Whatever may be the problem responsible for those unproductive days, lack of motivation is usually at the core of most of them.

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The Importance of Summer Science

two girls enjoying summer science in a forest

Fall, winter, spring…ahhhh summer. Should your student take a long break from schoolwork or keep learning year-round?

No matter the season, learning never stops.

But some studies have shown that an extended time away from active learning can cause knowledge to wane, especially in math and reading.

To keep these skills sharp, we recommend some fun summer science activities, so your student retains what you’ve taught them and is ready for the next Berean Builders course.

You can find many lists of summer science activities for your students of all ages with a quick online search.

Look for fun projects, natural observations, seasonal crafts, and kitchen chemistry (cooking) that include plenty of reading and math.

Project Based Learning For The Win (PBL FTW!)

Project based learning can be a great summer focus.

  • Plant a garden,
  • keep a weather record,
  • map the moon, stars, and planets each night.

Your student’s interests should lead the list of summer learning. Find what they love, then have a blast incorporating stealth lessons throughout the season.

Why stealth? Because some students balk when it comes to using “vacation” time for learning. Use your best judgement for your particular situation and find the quiet lessons in everyday science.

Most of all, give your student opportunities for critical thinking.

Let them decide what activities will be most effective. Let them do the research and planning.

Once they’re excited about a topic, let it run its course as long as they’re interested. Every moment spent enjoying a project is a moment dedicated to keeping their skills sharp all summer.

Get Out There and Science!

Whether you take a break from lessons or school year-round, summer is a great time to do science experiments in the great outdoors.

Biology, chemistry, physics, and earth science experiments abound, and summer is ideal for observing and interacting with nature and the world around us.

Summer is also a great time to complete any experiments you may have missed during the year.

Berean Builders science courses contain hundreds of hands-on experiments to help students comprehend abstract concepts with concrete actions and observations.

Moderation is the Key

Of course, we know you and your student need time off from teaching and learning to reboot, relax, and refresh. Summer learning doesn’t have to be every day! A couple of activities per week is plenty to make sure math and reading stay at level and learned science concepts stay in your student’s knowledge base.

Your future self will thank you for encouraging your student to practice what they’ve learned so you don’t have to reteach concepts or rehash last year’s lessons.

Make this summer one to remember with plenty of interesting science experiences. Then get ready to start a whole new science adventure in the fall!